Emily Carr's Winds of Heaven: Carvers and Spirits of the Forest

Suffering a crisis of confidence, worn down by the continued lack of recognition for her art by the Canadian establishment and her own crushing self-doubt, Emily Carr needed some encouragement. She found herself leafing through letters from her confidant and correspondent, Lawren Harris.

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The Group of Seven painter was effusive: "Despair is part of every creative individual; it can't be conquered," he wrote. "One rises out of it. I suppose we are only content when all our sails are up and full of the winds of heaven. I hope all your sails are up and full of the winds of heaven. There is only one way: keep on."

Filmmaker Michael Ostroff found himself turning to Harris's words too, for the title of his new documentary about Carr.

Carr fell in love with native culture and recreated it lovingly on canvas in a way that was unusual for a white artist of her time. Much of the film's content is supplied by Carr herself, with her words and images. Carr's lush, iconic paintings are paired with contemporary shots of the British Columbia landscape and native totem poles they depicted.

Winds of Heaven: Carvers and Spirits of the Forest is on Sunday November 9, 2014 at the Capitol Theatre in Port Hope. All proceeds go to the Northumberland Orchestra and Choir that help us ensure the financial ability. It is with the support of our communities that we are able to provide the highest calibre of orchestral music for your enjoyment.